Eureka Seven

Source: Wikipedia

Eureka Seven, known in Japan as Psalms of Planets Eureka Seven (Japanese: 交響詩篇エウレカセブン Hepburn: Kōkyōshihen Eureka Sebun, lit. “Symphonic Psalms Eureka Seven”), is a 2005 Japanese anime series created by Bones. The series was directed by Tomoki Kyoda, with series composition by Dai Satō and music by Naoki Satō.

Eureka Seven tells the story of Renton Thurston and the outlaw group Gekkostate, his relationship with the enigmatic mecha pilot Eureka, and the mystery of the Coralians. The fifty episode series premiered in Japan on MBS between April 17, 2005 and April 2, 2006 and was subsequently licensed by Funimation in North America, Madman Entertainment in Australia and New Zealand and by Anime Limited in the United Kingdom for English home video releases.

The series spawned six manga adaptations, a light novel, three video games and a feature-length anime film which was released in Japan on April 25, 2009. One of the manga titled Eureka Seven: AO which was serialized in Shōnen Ace between January 2012 and October 2013, was further adapted into an anime series which aired twenty-four episodes in Japan between April 13 and November 20, 2012. Eureka Seven was well received by critics and earned several awards at numerous award shows in Japan, most notably the 2006 Tokyo International Anime Fair.

The series was made by Bones and co-produced by Bandai Entertainment. Bandai Entertainment provided the title and handled the creative aspects of the series. Bandai had originally proposed a mecha anime series to the animation studio Bones. The studio had initially rejected it, but later reversed its position because it had already planned to create an anime using mecha designs by Shoji Kawamori. With the appointment of director Tomoki Kyoda and writer Dai Satō, Bandai’s proposal was more or less scrapped and the staff began work on their own series that would become Eureka Seven.

While conceptualizing Eureka Seven, Kyoda “wanted something that reflected the music and the subculture of his generation—and a love story.” As such the show contains several references from music of the 1980s and the 1990s, and almost all of the show’s episodes are named after real songs, composed by both Japanese and foreign artists.

The director wished to design the series as one that would at first focus on the personal elements and conflicts of the characters, then subsequently move the framework into a broader scale and perspective. The series’ two halves each have their own very clear focus that reflects this design choice.

With the premise of the surfer robots in mind, Satō interviewed several real-life surfers and came to conclusion that they are close to nature. From this perception, he envisioned the environmental thematic as central point of the story. He said “I thought it might be an effective message for children, especially in Japan. It’s pretty veiled. I didn’t want to be preachy.”

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